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Don’t Forget Me Review. Remember everything

The developers show the world of the near future, classic cyberpunk sketched with large pixels. All citizens carry memory chips in their heads, a department for the protection of memories functions in the government, and illegal craftsmen offer copying certain moments of life straight to a USB flash drive. The world, for obvious reasons, is not as sharply detailed as in Deus Ex(F95Zone) or Cyberpunk 2077 , but the creators of Don’t Forget Me still found their own interesting ideas . And the very details can be discerned: in the bar transparent holograms of singers are swaying to the music, and an angular robot is working at the bar instead of the bartender.

As for the story – and in a good quest there is no way without it, this is not another Call of Duty issue for you – then the beginning of the game will definitely upset video game connoisseurs. The amnesia of the protagonist (in our case, the heroine named Fran) has long been considered a mossy, rough cliche. What was forgiven for the audience’s favorite Geralt of Rivia, performed by the character of a cheap quest, looks ridiculous and stupid.

But, nevertheless, a girl named Fran does not remember anything except her name, although this is not certain. Bernard, a copier of memories, comes to her aid. The couple immediately gets along and soon takes up untangling, no less, a world conspiracy of those in power. Soon an active underground appears, somewhere behind the scenes a superintelligence looms, and scientists are looking for new ways to travel through other people’s memories. The scriptwriters nevertheless completed the minimum task, the intrigue is present here, albeit in a small amount.

The main task of the player and the forgetful Fran is to restore memories like in Best grenade spots dust 2. First, we will practice on cats and find the lost cat toy. And soon people of different social status with a heap of problems will find themselves in the chair of memory. The memory revitalization process showcases some really fresh and quite addicting game mechanics.

To access a specific memory, you need to open and connect key memory points, words that are important for each situation. We enter such words manually from the keyboard, and if the key is correct, a dot lights up on the screen. There can be several points on the same horizontal line of the display, and the memory is considered successfully activated only when we manage to draw a continuous line from left to right.

This is not an easy matter, and first you need to listen carefully to the client, noting the most important features for the desired memory episode. So, for a scientist, the chain of connected key words will look something like this: “Work-laboratory-threat-fear-flight”. The process is really interesting, although you will come to a dead end more often than you would like. Bernard will prompt at your request, but there is little sense from this.

Dialogues will take up a significant part of the playing time. The characters speak often and willingly, discussing everything from the weather to politics. In most cases, the dialogues are written vividly and do not cause rejection. And there may be more options than the usual denial, agreement and neutral tone. But sometimes the chatter is prolonged and the player has to read unvoiced lines without any meaning.

Each conversation will contain a lengthy exchange of pleasantries with questions about how comfortable the visitor is to sit in the chair, and so on. There is too much graphomania, and sometimes you want to skip texts without reading them. But this way you can skip an important clue and get stuck for a long time near the memory recovery chair. The situation is somewhat rescued by at least a few, but successful jokes and references to pop culture. So, the deaf helmet for copying memories is called “Facehugger” and says hello to Lieutenant Ripley.

The usual activity for fans of quests in Don’t Forget Me is not so much. You won’t even have to walk around locations using the familiar WASD keybind often. The scripts themselves drag the heroine to the remote control of the memory chair, and the player has to stir up someone else’s memory.

Conclusion:

But what definitely succeeded in Don’t Forget Me  was the musical accompaniment. Attentive players have noticed a trend long ago: games with a modest picture often delight with excellent music. Apparently, musicians with a burning gaze cost indie studios much cheaper than a licensed graphics engine. Here, wonderful jazz pours out of the speakers, which can suddenly be replaced by an aggressive theme with an electric guitar. It turns out very cool like difficult person test. The developers should be thanked separately for the parts with female vocals. For fans of a good soundtrack, we recommend that you pay close attention to Don’t Forget Me .

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